6 March 2015

A Bunch for the Weekend - # 42 - Blue and White Hyacinths




Today on 'A Bunch for the Weekend' - I'm featuring some blue and white hyacinths in a zinc container.

Hyacinths are spectacular at the moment they are still going strong and a real pleasure to use as cut flowers.


You'll need:

- 9 stems of blue hyacinths
- 5 stems of white hyacinths
- a low wide container in a neutral colour - in this case I have used a zinc container
- a piece of ornate Victorian iron work
- a large round blue and white plate
- a vintage blanket in dark colours 


For conditioning the flowers - you'll also need:

- a pair of florists scissors
- a florist bucket filled with fresh water

Condition the flowers by removing any leaves that would end up below the water line in the vase. This is to reduce any growth of bacteria from deteriorating leaves. Also remove any broken or bruised leaves.

Cut the stems at an angle - this is to increase water absorption.  

Put in a clean container with fresh water and leave in a cool, dark place over night or at least for a few hours, to let the flowers absorb the maximum of water, before making the final arrangement.

You might have to re-cut the stems while making the final arrangement to suit the size of the vase or container and to get the right proportions.

These stems come from hyacinth bulbs that I grew myself in pots and I just cut the stems and left all the leaves with the bulbs. When the leaves has died down I will plant them in my garden. Hopefully they will come back next year and not be decimated by slugs and snails or dug up by squirrels. 



You need to cut the stems quite short - but long enough to stand above the edge of the container - so hold the flower against the side of the container and measure.

I have packed the 14 stems in quite tightly - that way they all support each other.

Arrange the stems in a pleasing pattern according to colour and size of the flower heads. 


Experiment with the colours you surround the arrangement with - greys and blues all look lovely with the blue and white flowers. 

I have also added a fun little detail by putting a strip of grey washi tape along the edge of the zinc tub - its very easy to remove from any surface when you don't want it any more.

You can also do this with a smaller vase or container if you don't want to use as many stems as I have done. You can't go wrong here!!



Have a Happy Floral Friday and Enjoy Your Weekend!

~ xoxo ~

Ingrid

[Styling and Photography © Ingrid Henningsson for Of Spring and Summer]

3 March 2015

Floral Media - Blossom Zine Magazine - Spring 2015 by Dana Frigerio




The spring issue 2015 of Blossom Zine is out and it's available to read for free on the internet. 

Blossom Zine is about flowers, gardening and gardening design as well as travel, cooking, art, design and lots of gardens from around the world and it's bilingual - English and Italian.

The Editor-in-Chief is Dana Frigerio. Dana is a garden designer based in Italy and she also writes the blog Dana Garden Design.

In this issue you'll find lots of beautiful flower photography, DIY instruction on how to create a floral head piece, floral table decorations and fun giant origami garden sculptures. This is also a special issue about Singapore - which is the greenest city in Asia.



Have a Wonderful Floral Day!

See you later in the week.

~ xoxo ~ 

Ingrid

1 March 2015

Flowers of the Month - February 2015


Red and Pink Roses



2 February

I'm back with 'Flowers of the Month' - where I'm highlighting all the different flowers I have featured during the month of February.

The title of the post under the image - is also a link to the post - if you would like to see it again or you missed it.

Parrot Tulips


7 February

Snowdrops


9 February


Hot Pink Hyacinths


12 February


Pink Roses


14 February


White Chrysanthemums



16 February


Cloni Ranunculus



21 February


Pink Primula


23 February

Iris 'George'


25 February

Pink Tulips in a Cup



27 February



I hope you have enjoyed the month of February with all the early spring flowers. 

Now there is definitely a feeling of spring in the air!

Here are a few links to last years 'Flowers of the Month' to enjoy: 

Have a wonderful Floral Sunday! 

I will be back next month with another 'Flowers of the Month' - but before that I will see you again next week!


~ xoxo ~


Ingrid


[Styling and photography © Ingrid Henningsson for Of Spring and Summer.]

27 February 2015

A Bunch for the Weekend - # 41 - Hot Pink Tulips in a Cup



Pink Tulips in a Cup

Today on 'A Bunch for the Weekend' - I'm featuring some hot pink tulips in an antique blue and white floral cup.

Early tulips are fabulous at the moment and will be for a few more months. 

Pink Tulips in a Cup

You'll need:

- 15 stems of tulips in a bright colour
- a cup in a contrasting colour - in this case I have used an antique blue and white floral china cup
- a few little trinkets in the same colour as the cup - in this case I have used three vintage blue glass mini bottles 


For conditioning the flowers - you'll also need:

- a pair of florists scissors
- a florist bucket

Condition the flowers by removing any leaves that would end up below the water line in the vase. This is to reduce any growth of bacteria from deteriorating leaves. Also remove any broken or bruised leaves.

Cut the stems at an angle - this is to increase water absorption.  

Put in a clean container with fresh water and leave in a cool, dark place over night or at least for a few hours, to let the flowers absorb the maximum of water, before making the final arrangement.

You might have to re-cut the stems while making the final arrangement to suit the size of the vase or container and to get the right proportions.


Pink Tulips in a Cup

Cut the tulip stems quite short - short enough to sit right above the edge of the cup. Try to leave the top leaf on - to give just that little bit of green and to break up the mass of strong pink.

Fill the cup quite tightly - to give more impact both with colour and volume.

Pink Tulips in a Cup

Tulips continue to grow in the vase - so you have two choices.

1. When you change water in the vase re-cut the stems to the height you want them.

2. Change the water as usual - but let the tulips do whatever they want to do and enjoy their natural beauty.

Pink Tulips in a Cup


The three little cobalt blue glass bottles are vintage and they nicely pick up the blue colour on the cup.  

One used to contain 'bitter' - the other two with metal caps - I have no idea what they were used for. Bitter was used as an additive in cocktails and to promote appetite and digestion.   

This little arrangement is simple, quick and easy - BUT with a lot of strong colour and some attitude!

Are you ready to add some colour to your life? Well - colour is sometimes so welcome at this time of year - don't you think?


Pink Tulips in a Cup


Have a Happy Floral Friday and Enjoy Your Weekend!

~ xoxo ~

Ingrid

[Styling and Photography © Ingrid Henningsson for Of Spring and Summer]

25 February 2015

FLOWERS by ingrid and titti - Time for Bulbs!


Iris 'George'

The theme for FLOWERS this week is called 'Time for Bulbs!' 
At the farmers' market last Wednesday I found these absolutely fabulous irises called Iris 'George'. They have a dark, rich purple colour with yellow and white blotches on the petals. 

Most irises grow from what's called a rhizome - but this early flowering iris grows from a bulb. It flowers very early in the year and it will brighten up any winter garden with its plum-purple colour.   

Isis 'George'

I wanted to keep them growing in their pots - as I will later on plant them in the garden. But I needed to hide the brown plastic pot. 

I covered the bottom of the plastic pot with a plastic bag. I then wrapped the whole pot with two layers of paper. 

I did three different versions. One had dark purple with lighter coloured purple tissue paper, one had dark purple with brown tissue paper and the third had dark purple tissue combined with plain brown wrapping paper.

I tied some purple twine around one, black twine around another and a purple ribbon around the last one.

The purple ribbon is from Jane Means collection.


Iris 'George'

I also wanted to try using the Iris as a cut flower in a vase. So here I have used a little black straight-sided vase that holds the flowers upright in a tight bunch.

Iris 'George'

I have kept the colour scheme mostly in the rich purple tones with a few additions of brown and black.

Iris 'George'


Now is the time to catch these early Irises - they don't last very long - but while they are here - make the most of it!


Iris 'George'


Titti Malmberg - my Swedish based collaborator - who I work alongside on FLOWERS - has also created a blog post over on her blog HWIT BLOGG - so please follow the link and go over and see what she has done. 

You can see all our FLOWERS posts Here. 

We also have a special board over on Pinterest with images from FLOWERS.


Have a Very Happy Floral Day!

See you later in the week.

~ xoxo ~ 

Ingrid


[Styling and photography © Ingrid Henningsson for FLOWERS and Of Spring and Summer.]
[Ribbons by Jane Means.]

23 February 2015

Tiny Blooms - # 9 - Pink Primula


Pink Primula



This series of blog posts - called 'Tiny Blooms - are about small arrangements. Small - might be the size of the container or it could be the size of the flowers or the amount of stems in each container. It will also be that the arrangement is minimal both in presentation and that it's quick and easy to do. Apart from that there are no other strict rules - I'm allowing myself a lot of creative freedom!


Pink Primula


I love making these tiny flower arrangements - because they are so much fun to do. I always keep an eye out for what's growing in the garden and what's available at the garden centre or what I can find at the farmers' market. 

I'm always looking for my next 'Tiny Blooms' flowers.

As the Primula is the 'Houseplant of the Month' now in February - I thought I would try using it as a cut flower.

You can find more information about the houseplants here.

I had a question last week asking me if Primula and Primrose were the same flower and the answer to that is yes it is. Primula is the Latin or botanical name and the common name is Primrose. There are many different primroses - both the wild ones found in nature and there are also many cultivated ones sold in nurseries and garden centres.


Pink Primula


I simply cut about 20 little stems from the plants I had. Try to cut as low down as possible to get long stems.

Start off by placing the shorter stems around the edge of the container - letting them rest on the edge and put the longer ones in the middle - you then end up with a nice dome shaped little arrangement. 

As a vase I used a vintage cream ware container - it has a nice and neutral colour - so perfect for giving all the attention to the little flowers.

A welcome splash of colour on this dark and rainy day in February! 


Pink Primula


Have a Lovely Floral Day!

I'll see you later in the week with another 
'FLOWERS by ingrid and titti'

~ xoxo ~

Ingrid 



[Styling and Photography © Ingrid Henningsson for Of Spring and Summer.]

21 February 2015

A Bunch for the Weekend - # 40 - Pale Pink Cloni Ranunculus


Cloni Ranunculus


Today on 'A Bunch for the Weekend' - I'm featuring some very pretty pale pink Cloni Ranunculus from Italy - where they grow beautiful Ranunculus with very large flower heads.


Cloni Ranunculus


 You'll need:

- 20 stems of Ranunculus in a pale pink colour
- a medium size clear glass vase
- 2 small containers for off-cut flower buds
- a few pompoms, a pile of books and a zinc watering can - all in grey tones
- a little white painted foot stool or similar and some gauze or other thin white translucent fabric 


For conditioning the flowers - you'll also need:

- a pair of florists scissors
- a florist bucket

Condition the flowers by removing any leaves that would end up below the water line in the vase. This is to reduce any growth of bacteria from deteriorating leaves. Also remove any broken or bruised leaves.

Cut the stems at an angle - this is to increase water absorption.  

Put in a clean container with fresh water and leave in a cool, dark place over night or at least for a few hours, to let the flowers absorb the maximum of water, before making the final arrangement.

You might have to re-cut the stems while making the final arrangement to suit the size of the vase or container and to get the right proportions.

Be gentle when you are handling the flowers as Ranunculus are quite fragile - the stems are soft and the delicate, papery petals tear and bruise easily.

Keep the water level in the vase low - if too much water the stems tend to rot.

The flowers should last for a week or sometimes longer.

If there are any small or big flower buds - keep them to make a few small arrangements on the side.


Cloni Rananculus


Start with some of the shorter stems and let the flower heads rest on the edge of the vase. Always measure the stems against the outside of the vase to make sure you get the right height. Continue filling the centre of the arrangement with slightly taller stems. 

Try to pack them as tightly as you can as you want to see as little as possible of the green stems. That way they also support each other in the vase preventing the stems from breaking. 

Pink Ranunculus

If you have saved any buds from when you conditioned the flowers - put them in a couple of small vases. They have a very different but interesting colour and texture then the flowers.

Cloni Ranunculus

I have combined the delicate, pale pink flowers with some neutral grey colours - including pompoms in two different sizes, a zinc mini watering can and some vintage books - chosen purely for the colour of the cover! 

Pink Ranunculus


For the next few months enjoy the beauty of these wonderful flowers - they are usually available until the late spring.


Cloni Ranunculus


Have a Happy Floral Saturday and Enjoy Your Weekend!

~ xoxo ~

Ingrid

[Styling and Photography © Ingrid Henningsson for Of Spring and Summer]